Updated 4-09-2009
In alphabetical order by last name. This is a work in progress.

  1. SERGEANT ALCHESAY U.S. Army, Indian Scouts, Post Civil War
  2. SERGEANT FIRST CLASS EUGENE ASHLEY, JR. U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  3. SERGEANT GARY B. BEIKIRCH U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  4. PRIVATE BLANQUET U.S. Army, Indian Scouts, Post Civil War
  5. SERGEANT FIRST CLASS WILLIAM M. BRYANT U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  6. SERGEANT BRIAN L. BUKER U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  7. STAFF SERGEANT JON R. CAVAIANI U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  8. PRIVATE CHIQUITO U.S. Army, Indian Scouts, Post Civil War
  9. STAFF SERGEANT DREW D. DIX U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  10. CAPTAIN ROGER H. C. DONLON U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  11. PRIVATE POMPEY FACTOR U.S. Army, Indian Scouts, Post Civil War
  12. MAJOR BERNARD F. FISHER U.S. Air Force, 1st Air Commando Squadron, Vietnam
  13. CAPTAIN JAMES P. FLEMING U.S. Air Force, 20th Special Operations Squadron, Vietnam
  14. FIRST LIEUTENANT LOREN D. HAGEN U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  15. MASTER SERGEANT CHARLES E. HOSKING JR. U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  16. FIRST LIEUTENANT ROBERT L. HOWARD U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  17. LIEUTENANT COLONEL JOE M. JACKSON U.S. Air Force, 311 Air Commando Squadron, Vietnam
  18. SERGEANT JIM U.S. Army, Indian Scouts, Post Civil War
  19. COLONEL WILLIAM A. JONES III U.S. Air Force, 602nd Special Operations Squadron, Vietnam
  20. SPECIALIST FIFTH CLASS JOHN J. KEDENBURG U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  21. LIEUTENANT (JUNIOR GRADE) JOSEPH R KERREY U.S. Navy, SEALs, Vietnam
  22. SPECIALIST FOURTH CLASS ROBERT D. LAW U.S. Army, Rangers, Vietnam
  23. SERGEANT JOHN L. LEVITOW U.S. Air Force, 3rd Air Commando Squadron, Vietnam
  24. STAFF SERGEANT FRANKLIN D. MILLER U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  25. PETTY OFFICER 2ND CLASS MICHAEL A. MONSOOR U.S. Navy, SEALs, Iraq
  26. LEUITENANT MICHAEL P. MURPHY U.S. Navy, SEALs, Afghanistan
  27. LIEUTENANT THOMAS R. NORRIS U.S. Navy, SEALs, Vietnam
  28. SERGEANT ROBERT J. PRUDEN U.S. Army, Rangers, Vietnam
  29. SERGEANT LASZLO RABEL U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  30. LIEUTENANT GEORGE K. SISLER U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  31. ENGINEMAN SECOND CLASS MICHAEL E. THORNTON U.S. Navy, SEALs, Vietnam
  32. SERGEANT GORDON D. YNTEMA U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  33. FIRST LIEUTENANT CHARLES Q. WILLIAMS U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  34. SERGEANT FIRST CLASS FRED W. ZABITOSKY U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
  1. (Back to Top) SERGEANT ALCHESAY, U.S. Army, Indian Scouts, Post Civil War
    Theater: NORTH
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to SERGEANT ALCHESAY, INDIAN SCOUTS, UNITED STATES ARMY, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.
    Place and Date: Arizona, Winter Campaign 1872-1873
    Date of Issue: 12 April 1875
    Citation: Gallant conduct during campaign and engagements with Apaches.
  2. (Back to Top) SERGEANT FIRST CLASS EUGENE ASHLEY, JR., U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to SERGEANT FIRST CLASS EUGENE ASHLEY, JR., UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Sergeant First Class Eugene Ashley, Jr., serving with Detachment A-101, Company C, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, near Lang Vei Special Forces camp, distinguished himself on 6 and 7 February 1968. Sergeant First Class Ashley, Senior Special Force Advisor, was given the mission to lead a hastily assembled assault force to rescue the Special Forces team entrapped in Lang Vei, a Special Forces camp. During the initial attack on the camp, Sergeant First Class Ashley supported the camp with high explosive and illumination mortar rounds. After losing communications with the main camp, Sergeant First Class Ashley began directing air strikes and artillery support against the enemy and simultaneously assembled a small assault force composed of local friendly personnel. During the ensuing battle, Sergeant First Class Ashley continually exposed himself to enemy grenades and led a total five assaults against the enemy, by now entrenched in captured camp bunkers. His total disregard for his own personal safety was an inspiration to all his force. During his fifth and final assault, he called in air strikes nearly on top of his element, forcing the enemy to withdraw and resulting in friendly control of the summit of the hill. After the fifth assault, he lost consciousness and was carried from the summit only to suffer a fatal wound when an enemy artillery round landed near him. The resolute valor with which he led five gallant charges thrust a hole in the enemy positions through which the survivors of Camp Lang Vei eventually escaped to freedom. Sergeant First Class Ashley's conspicuous gallantry at the cost of his life was above and beyond the call of duty and in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  3. (Back to Top) SERGEANT GARY B. BEIKIRCH, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to SERGEANT GARY B. BEIKIRCH, UNITED STATES ARMY, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Sergeant Gary B. Beikirch, Medical Aidman, Detachment B-24, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, distinguished himself on 1 April 1970, during the defense of Camp Dak Seang, Republic of Vietnam. The allied defenders suffered a number of casualties as a result of an intense, devastating attack launched by the enemy from concealed positions surrounding the camp. With utter disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Beikirch moved unhesitatingly through the withering enemy fire to his fallen comrades, applied first aid and assisted them to a medical aid station. When informed that a seriously wounded American officer was lying in an exposed position, Sergeant Beikirch ran immediately through a hail of fire. Although seriously wounded by mortar shell fragments, Sergeant Beikirch carried the officer to a medical aid station. Ignoring his own serious injuries, he again left the safety of the bunker to search for and evacuate other men who had been injured. He was again wounded as he dragged a critically injured Vietnamese to a medical aid bunker and applied mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to sustain his life. Sergeant Beikirch again refused treatment and continued his search for other casualties until he collapsed. Sergeant Beikirch's conspicuous gallantry in action, his complete devotion to the welfare of his comrades, and intrepidity at the risk of his life, above and beyond the call of duty, are in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the up most credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  4. (Back to Top) PRIVATE BLANQUET, U.S. Army, Indian Scouts, Post Civil War
    Theater: NORTH
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to PRIVATE BLANQUET, INDIAN SCOUTS, UNITED STATES ARMY, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.
    Place and Date: Arizona, Winter Campaign 1872-1873
    Date of Issue: 12 April 1875
    Citation: Gallant conduct during campaign and engagements with Apaches.
  5. (Back to Top) SERGEANT FIRST CLASS WILLIAM M. BRYANT, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to SERGEANT FIRST CLASS WILLIAM M. BRYANT, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Sergeant First Class William M. Bryant, assigned to Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, distinguished himself on 24 March 1969, as Commanding Officer of Civilian Irregular Defense Group Company 321, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Mobile Strike Force during combat in Long Khanh Province, Republic of Vietnam. Surrounded by three enemy regiments, the battalion came under heavy fire. Sergeant First Class Bryant displayed extraordinary heroism throughout the succeeding 34 hours of incessant attack as he moved throughout the company's position, heedless of the intense fire, directing fire during critical phases of the battle, distributing ammunition, assisting the wounded, and providing leadership and an inspirational example of courage to his men. When a re-supply drop of ammunition was made, Sergeant First Class Bryant, with complete disregard for his own safety, ran through heavy fire to retrieve the scattered ammunition boxes and distribute them to the men. During a lull in the fighting, Sergeant First Class Bryant led a patrol outside the perimeter to obtain information about the enemy. The patrol came under automatic weapons fire and was pinned down. Sergeant First Class Bryant single-handedly repulsed one enemy attack on his small force and by his heroic actions inspired his men to fight off other assaults. Seeing a wounded enemy soldier, Sergeant First Class Bryant crawled forward alone under heavy fire to retrieve the soldier for intelligence purposes. Finding the soldier dead, he crawled back and led his men back to the company position where he then again took command of the defense. He then organized and led a patrol in a daring attempt to break through the enemy encirclement. In spite of heavy fighting, the patrol advanced some two hundred meters but was pinned down by automatic weapons fire from fortified bunkers. Sergeant First Class Bryant was severely wounded. Despite his wounds, he rallied his men, called for gunship support, and directed heavy suppressive fire upon the enemy position. Following the last airship attack, Sergeant First Class Bryant fearlessly charged and overran an enemy automatic weapons position, single-handedly killing its three defenders. Inspired by his heroic example, his men continued their attack on the entrenched enemy. While regrouping his small force, Sergeant First Class Bryant fell mortally wounded by an enemy rocket. Sergeant First Class Bryant's conspicuous gallantry, selfless concern for his comrades and intrepidity at the cost of his own life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military services and reflect great credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  6. (Back to Top) SERGEANT BRIAN L. BUKER, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to SERGEANT BRIAN L. BUKER, UNITED STATES ARMY, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Sergeant Brian L. Buker, Detachment B-55, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, distinguished himself on 5 April 1970, while serving as a platoon advisor to a Vietnamese Mobile Strike Force Company during an offensive mission in Chau Doc Province, Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Buker personally led the platoon, cleared a strategically located, well-guarded pass, and established the first foothold at the top of what had been an impenetrable mountain fortress. When the platoon came under intense fire from two heavily fortified enemy bunkers, and realizing that withdrawal would result in heavy casualties, Sergeant Buker unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own safety charged through the hail of heavy fire and destroyed the first bunker with hand grenades. While organizing his men for the attack on the second bunker, he fell seriously wounded. Despite his wounds and the deadly enemy fire, he crawled forward and destroyed the second bunker. Sergeant Buker refused medical attention and was reorganizing his men to continue the attack when he was mortally wounded. As a direct result of his heroic actions, many casualties were averted, and the assault of the enemy position was successful. Sergeant Buker's conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroism at the cost of his life are in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting great credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  7. (Back to Top) STAFF SERGEANT JON R. CAVAIANI, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to STAFF SERGEANT JON R. CAVAIANI, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Staff Sergeant Jon R. Cavaiani, United States Army Vietnam Advisory Group, distinguished himself on 4 and 5 June 1971, as platoon leader of a security platoon providing security for an isolated radio relay site located within enemy-held territory in the Republic of Vietnam. On 4 June, the site came under an intense barrage of automatic weapons, rocket-propelled grenade and mortar fire from a superior enemy force. Staff Sergeant Cavaiani, acting with complete disregard for his personal safety, repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire in order to move about the camp's perimeter directing the platoon's fire and rallying the platoon in its desperate fight for survival. Simultaneously, Staff Sergeant Cavaiani returned heavy suppressive fire upon the assaulting enemy force with a variety of weapons. Due to his ground direction, three extraction helicopters were able to land and evacuate the majority of the platoon. Increasingly intense enemy fire, however, kept other helicopters from landing. Forced to stay overnight, Staff Sergeant Cavaiani directed the platoon to strengthen their defenses. On the morning of 5 June, with heavy fog restricting visibility, a superior-sized enemy force launched its attack in an effort to completely annihilate the American unit. Advancing methodically in two ranks, the first rank fired a heavy volume of automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenade fire at the same time that the second rank threw a steady barrage of hand grenades at the beleaguered force. Staff Sergeant Cavaiani returned the heavy barrage of small arms and hand grenade fire, but was unable to slow them down. Ordering his platoon to escape, Staff Sergeant Cavaiani, with one last courageous effort, recovered a machine gun, stood up, completely exposing himself to the heavy enemy fire, and began sweeping machine gun fire against the two advancing enemy ranks. Through his valiant efforts, the majority of the platoon members were able to escape. While inflicting severe losses on the advancing enemy force, Staff Sergeant Cavaiani was wounded numerous times. Staff Sergeant Cavaiani's conspicuous gallantry in action, his complete devotion to the welfare of his comrades, and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  8. (Back to Top) PRIVATE CHIQUITO, U.S. Army, Indian Scouts, Post Civil War
    Theater: NORTH
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to PRIVATE CHIQUITO, INDIAN SCOUTS, UNITED STATES ARMY, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.
    Place and Date: Arizona, Winter Campaign 1872-1873
    Date of Issue: 12 April 1875
    Citation: Gallant conduct during campaign and engagements with Apaches.
  9. (Back to Top) STAFF SERGEANT DREW D. DIX, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to STAFF SERGEANT DREW D. DIX, UNITED STATES ARMY, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Staff Sergeant Drew D. Dix distinguished himself on 31 January and 1 February 1968, while serving as a unit advisor in Chau Doc Province, Republic of Vietnam. Two heavily armed Viet Gong battalions attacked the Province capital on 31 January 1968, resulting in the complete breakdown and fragmentation of the defenses of the city. Staff Sergeant Dix and a patrol of Vietnamese soldiers were recalled to assist in the defense of Chau Phu. Learning that a nurse was trapped in her home near the center of the city, Staff Sergeant Dix organized a relief force, successfully rescuing the nurse and returning her to the safety of Tactical Operations Center. Being informed of other trapped civilians, he volunteered to lead another force to rescue eight employees held hostage in a building. While approaching the building, he was subjected to intense automatic rifle and machine gun fire from a Viet Gong element. He assaulted the building, killing six Viet Gong and rescuing two Filipinos. The following day, Staff Sergeant Dix, of his own volition and disregarding the danger to his life, assembled a 20-man force and under intense enemy fire cleared the Viet Gong out of the hotel, theater, and other buildings within the city. Republic of Vietnam soldiers, inspired by the heroism and success of Staff Sergeant Dix, rallied and began firing upon the assaulting Viet Gong force. Staff Sergeant Dix captured 20 prisoners, including a high ranking Viet Gong official. Staff Sergeant Dix continued his attack and successfully overcame the enemy who had entered the residence of the Deputy Province Chief and were holding the official's wife and children. Staff Sergeant Dix's personal heroic actions resulted in 14 confirmed Viet Gong killed in action, and possibly 25 more, the capture of 20 prisoners, 15 weapons and the rescue of 14 U.S. and Free World citizens. Staff Sergeant Dix's conspicuous gallantry in action, his complete devotion to the welfare of others, and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  10. (Back to Top) CAPTAIN ROGER H. C. DONLON, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to CAPTAIN ROGER H. C. DONLON, UNITED STATES ARMY to for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Captain Roger H. C. Donlon, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, distinguished himself on 6 July 1964, while commanding Special Forces Detachment A- 726 at N am Dong, Republic of Vietnam. On 6 July, the camp was assaulted in a pre-dawn attack by a reinforced Viet Cong battalion. During the violent five-hour battle, resulting in numerous casualties on both sides, Captain Donlon directed the overall defense of the camp. He swiftly marshalled his forces and ordered the removal of needed ammunition from a blazing building hit by the initial assault. He then dashed through a hail of small arms and exploding hand grenade fires to a breach of the main gate where he detected and annihilated an enemy three-man demolition team. Exposed to an intense attack and sustaining a severe stomach wound, he succeeded in reaching the 60mm mortar pit. Discovering most of the men in the gun pit were wounded, Captain Donlon, disregarding his own injury, risked his own life by remaining in the pit and returning the enemy fire, allowing the men to withdraw. While dragging his team sergeant out of the gunpit, an enemy mortar round exploded, hitting Captain Donlon's left shoulder. Suffering from multiple wounds, he carried the 60mm mortar to a new location 30 meters away where he found another three wounded defenders. After administering first aid and encouragement to these men, he left the weapon with them and then raced toward another location, retrieving a 57mm recoilless rifle. With great courage under fire, he returned to the abandoned gunpit, evacuated ammunition for the weapons and crawling and dragging back the urgently needed ammunition, received a third wound on his leg. Despite his critical condition, he crawled 175 meters to an 81mm mortar position and began directing firing operations which protected the east sector of the camp. Until daylight brought defeat of the enemy forces, Captain Donlon moved from position to position around the beleaguered perimeter, hurling grenades at the enemy and inspiring his men to superhuman effort. Captain Donlon's conspicuous gallantry, extraordinary heroism and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  11. (Back to Top) PRIVATE POMPEY FACTOR, U.S. Army, Indian Scouts, Post Civil War
    Theater: NORTH
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to PRIVATE POMPEY FACTOR, INDIAN SCOUTS, UNITED STATES ARMY, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.
    Place and Date: Pecos River, Texas, 25 April 1875
    Date of Issue: 28 May 1875
    Citation: With three other men, he participated in a charge against 25 hostiles while on a scouting patrol.
  12. (Back to Top) MAJOR BERNARD F. FISHER, U.S. Air Force, 1st Air Commando Squadron, Vietnam
    (first recipient of the Air Force Medal of Honor for Vietnam)

    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States in the 'name of the Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to MAJOR BERNARD F. FISHER, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    On 10 March 1966, Major Bernard F. Fisher was flying his A-IE Skyraider in a formation (1st Air Commando Squadron) supporting the survivors of a 450-man Special Forces camp located in A Shau Valley near Laos which was being overrun by a North Vietnamese regimental-sized force. While the entire A-IE formation was strafing and dropping napalm on enemy positions, a companion aircraft was crippled by enemy fire and had to make a forced landing on the camp airstrip now controlled by the enemy. Abandoning the downed aircraft, the pilot was observed by Major Fisher to be fleeing from Vietnamese pursuers and was almost at the point of capture. Determining that no other aircraft capable of making the pilot extraction would be able to arrive in time, Major Fisher made the snap-decision to attempt the pick-up himself despite the extremely low probability of success. Flying through smoke and fire, he broke into the clear just over the edge of the runway and dropped his plane on to the airstrip which was pockmarked with mortar holes and strewn with battle debris. In spite of the damage caused to his plane from expended rocket casings and barrels on the runway, Major Fisher avoided a crash of his own and skidded to a stop just short of a fuel dump. Wheeling the aircraft around, Major Fisher began taxiing up the runway looking for the downed pilot as small arms fire peppered the ground around him. Finding the downed pilot hiking amidst the battle debris and wreckage on the landing strip, he braked his plane and allowed the pilot to clamber into the cockpit headfirst. Without waiting for the pilot to strap in, Major Fisher turned the plane around and jammed the throttle forward. Despite the damage the plane had suffered, Major Fisher was able to take off successfully and escape to safety. As a result of Major Fisher's selflessness and conspicuous gallantry, he became the first recipient of the Air Force Medal of Honor in Vietnam.
  13. (Back to Top) CAPTAIN JAMES P. FLEMING, U.S. Air Force, 20th Special Operations Squadron, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States in the name of the Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to CAPTAIN JAMES P. FLEMING, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Captain James P. Fleming (then First Lieutenant) distinguished himself as the Aircraft Commander of a UH-IF transport helicopter (20th Special Operations Squadron) by effecting the rescue of a six-man Special Forces long range reconnaissance patrol that was in danger of being overrun by a large, heavily armed hostile force on 26 November 1968. The Green Berets had just been inserted into a heavily forested area near Duc Co in South Vietnam's central highlands, when they came under intense fire from a much larger enemy force. As a result, the team leader urgently requested an emergency extraction. The call was heard by a Green Hornet flight of five helicopters, including Captain Fleming's, returning to their base from another mission for refueling and rearming. The two gunships and three transports ("slicks"), already low on fuel, immediately turned around and raced to the relief of the trapped patrol. They arrived to find the team blocked on three sides and trapped with their backs to an impassable river. The gunships attacked immediately with their mini-guns. However, one of the gunships was hit by enemy machine gun fire, and forced to autorotate to a forced landing in a small clearing. The lead slick followed the crippled aircraft down and rescued the crew only minutes before enemy troops arrived in the clearing. The number two slick, low on fuel itself, was forced to withdraw. This left only Captain Fleming's slick and the surviving gunship to rescue the desperate Special Forces troopers. After ordering the patrol to move the 20 yards separating it from the river bank and another small clearing, the gunship positioned itself between the enemy and the patrol as Captain Fleming flared into the clearing, which was only accessible by pointing the helicopter's nose over the river bank with the tail of the 48-foot long helicopter extending back out over the river. Seeing the team had not been able to get to the clearing for the rescue and that waiting for them on that pass would make the helicopter a stationary target in the open, Captain Fleming backed the chopper out while his door gunners kept the enemy at bay. Despite heavy enemy fire and dangerously low on fuel, Captain Fleming knew his helicopter was the team's only hope for escape. As he brought his aircraft around and headed back again into the same small clearing on the river bank, the chopper came under extremely heavy fire. However, this time, as Captain Fleming nudged his helicopter in the clearing, the reconnaissance team detonated a series of Claymore mines around their position that caused enough of a lull in the enemy firing to permit them to get to the clearing and clamber aboard the helicopter. As the slick climbed away from the river, gunfire shattered the windshield but missed Captain Fleming, his crew and the team. Returning to Duc Co, the shot-up helicopter safely landed with virtually empty fuel tanks. Captain Fleming's courage, selflessness, and great skill as pilot were recognized by award of the Air Force Medal of Honor.
  14. (Back to Top) FIRST LIEUTENANT LOREN D. HAGEN, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to FIRST LIEUTENANT LOREN D. HAGEN, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    First Lieutenant Loren D. Hagen, United States Army Vietnam Advisory Group, distinguished himself on 7 August 1971, as team leader of a reconnaissance team operating deep in enemy territory in the Republic of Vietnam. At 0630 hours, the team came under a heavy assault of small arms, automatic weapons, rocket and mortar fire from a superior-sized enemy force. First Lieutenant Hagen immediately returned small arms fire upon the attackers and successfully led his team in repelling the first onslaught. He quickly deployed his men into better defensive locations before the enemy struck again in an attempt to overrun and annihilate the team. First Lieutenant Hagen repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire as he moved about the team's perimeter, directing fire, rallying the soldiers, and re-supplying the team with ammunition while at the same time returning small arms and grenade fire in a valorous attempt to repel the advancing enemy force. The courageous actions and expert leadership of First Lieutenant Hagen were a great source of inspiration and instilled confidence in the team members. Observing that an enemy rocket had directly hit and destroyed one of the team's bunkers, First Lieutenant Hagen advanced toward the bunker searching for team members despite the fact that the enemy force now controlled the bunker area. Returning small arms fire, First Lieutenant Hagen, with total disregard for his personal safety, crawled through the enemy rocket and grenade fire toward the bunker until he was fatally wounded. First Lieutenant Hagen's courageous actions, high degree of professionalism and untiring efforts in the face of overwhelming odds was a great inspiration and of inestimable value to this team. First Lieutenant Hagen's extraordinary gallantry in action, complete devotion to the welfare of his comrades, and intrepidity at the cost of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  15. (Back to Top) MASTER SERGEANT CHARLES E. HOSKING JR., U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to MASTER SERGEANT CHARLES E. HOSKING JR., for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Master Sergeant Charles E. Hosking, Jr., (then Sergeant First Class), Detachment A-302, company A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, distinguished himself on 21 March 1967, as a company advisor in the Civilian Irregular Defense Group Reaction Battalion during combat operations in Phuoc Long Province, Republic of Vietnam. A Viet Cong suspect was apprehended and subsequently identified as a Viet Cong sniper. While Master Sergeant Hosking was preparing the prisoner for movement back to the base camp, he suddenly grabbed a grenade from Master Sergeant Hosking's belt, armed the grenade and started running toward the command group. With utter disregard for his own personal safety, Master Sergeant Hosking grasped the Viet Cong in a "bear hug," forced the grenade against the enemy's chest, and wrestled the prisoner to the ground. Covering the sniper's body with his own until the grenade detonated, Master Sergeant Hosking was killed. By absorbing the force of the exploding grenade with his body and that of the enemy, he saved the other members of his command from death or serious injury. Master Sergeant Hosking's conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  16. (Back to Top) FIRST LIEUTENANT ROBERT L. HOWARD, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to FIRST LIEUTENANT ROBERT L. HOWARD, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    First Lieutenant (then Sergeant First Class) Robert L. Howard, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, distinguished himself on 30 December 1968, while serving as a platoon sergeant on a mission to rescue a missing American soldier in enemy-controlled territory. The platoon left its helicopter and was moving out when it was attacked by an estimated two company force. First Lieutenant Howard was wounded and his weapon destroyed by a grenade explosion. His platoon leader was wounded seriously and was exposed to enemy fire. Although unable to walk and weaponless, First Lieutenant Howard unhesitatingly crawled through a hail of fire to retrieve his wounded leader. As First Lieutenant Howard was rendering first aid, an enemy bullet struck one of the ammunition pouches on the lieutenant's belt, detonating several magazines of ammunition. First Lieutenant Howard began dragging the seriously wounded officer toward the platoon area. Through his indomitable courage and bravery, First Lieutenant Howard was able to rally the platoon into an organized defense force. With complete disregard for his own safety, First Lieutenant Howard crawled from position to position, directing fire on the encircling enemy. For three and one-half hours, First Lieutenant Howard's small force and supporting aircraft successfully repulsed enemy attacks and finally were in sufficient control to permit the landing of rescue helicopters. First Lieutenant Howard did not leave the bullet-swept landing zone until all were safely aboard. His conspicuous gallantry in action, his complete devotion to the welfare of his men and his intrepidity at the risk of his own life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  17. (Back to Top) LIEUTENANT COLONEL JOE M. JACKSON, U.S. Air Force, 311 Air Commando Squadron, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States in the 'name of the Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to LIEUTENANT COLONEL JOE M. JACKSON, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Lieutenant Colonel Joe M. Jackson distinguished himself as pilot of a C-123 aircraft (311th Air Commando Squadron) in the Republic of Vietnam, on 12 May 1968. On that date, Lieutenant Colonel Jackson volunteered to attempt the rescue of a three-man USAF Combat Control Team from the Special Forces Camp at Kham Duc. Hostile forces had overrun the forward outpost and established gun positions on the airstrip. They were raking the camp with small arms, mortars, light and heavy automatic weapons, and recoilless rifle fire. The camp was engulfed in flames and ammunition dumps were continuously exploding and littering the runway with debris. In addition, eight aircraft had been destroyed by the intense enemy fire and one aircraft remained on the runway reducing its usable length to only 2,200 feet. To further complicate the landing, the weather was deteriorating rapidly, thereby permitting only one airstrike prior to his landing. Although fully aware of the extreme danger and likely failure of such an attempt, Lieutenant Colonel Jackson elected to land his aircraft and attempt the rescue. Displaying superb airmanship and extraordinary heroism, he landed his aircraft near the point where the Combat Control Team was reported to be hiding. While on the ground, his aircraft was the target of intense hostile fire. A rocket landed in front of the nose of the aircraft but failed to explode. Once the Combat Control team was aboard, Lieutenant Colonel Jackson succeeded in getting airborne despite the hostile fire directed across the runway in front of his aircraft. Lieutenant Colonel Jackson's conspicuous gallantry, his profound concern for his fellow man, and his intrepidity at risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Air Force and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.
  18. (Back to Top) SERGEANT JIM, U.S. Army, Indian Scouts, Post Civil War
    Theater: NORTH
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to PRIVATE CHIQUITO, INDIAN SCOUTS, UNITED STATES ARMY, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.
    Place and Date: Arizona, Winter Campaign 1872-1873
    Date of Issue: 12 April 1875
    Citation: Gallant conduct during campaign and engagements with Apaches.
  19. (Back to Top) COLONEL WILLIAM A. JONES III, U.S. Air Force, 602nd Special Operations Squadron, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States in the name of the Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to COLONEL WILLIAM A. JONES III, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Colonel William A. Jones III distinguished himself as pilot of an A-1H Skyraider aircraft (602nd Special Operations Squadron) near Dong Hoi, North Vietnam, on 1 September 1968. On that day, as the on-scene commander in the attempted rescue of a downed U.S. pilot, Colonel Jones' aircraft was repeatedly hit by heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire. On one of his low passes, Colonel Jones felt an explosion beneath his aircraft and his cockpit rapidly filled with smoke. With complete disregard of the possibility that his aircraft might still be burning, he unhesitatingly continued his search for the downed pilot. On this pass, he sighted the survivor and a multiple-barrel gun position firing at him from near the top of a karst formation. He could not attack the gun position on that pass for fear he would endanger the downed pilot. Leaving himself exposed to the gun position, Colonel Jones attacked the position with cannon and rocket fire on two successive passes. On his second pass, the aircraft was hit by multiple rounds of automatic weapons fire. One round impacted the Yankee Extraction System rocket mounted directly behind the head rest, igniting the rocket, His aircraft was observed to burst into flames engulfing the cockpit area. He pulled the extraction handle, jettisoning the canopy. The influx of fresh air made the fire burn with greater intensity for a few moments, but since the rocket motor had already burned, the extraction system did not pull Colonel Jones from the aircraft. Despite searing pain from severe burns sustained on his arms, hands, neck, shoulders, and face, Colonel Jones pulled his aircraft into a climb and attempted to transmit the location of the downed pilot and the enemy gun position to the other aircraft in the area. His calls were blocked by other aircraft transmissions repeatedly directing him to bailout and within seconds his transmitters were disabled and he could receive only on one channel. Completely disregarding his injuries, he elected to fly his crippled aircraft back to his base and pass on essential information for the rescue rather than bailout. Colonel Jones successfully landed his heavily damaged aircraft and passed the information to a debriefing officer while on the operating table. Colonel Jones' profound concern for his fellow man at the risk of his life, above and beyond the call of duty, are in keeping with highest traditions of the U.S. Air Force and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.
  20. (Back to Top) SPECIALIST FIFTH CLASS JOHN J. KEDENBURG, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to SPECIALIST FIFTH CLASS JOHN J. KEDENBURG, UNITED STATES ARMY, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Specialist Fifth Class John J. Kedenburg, Command and Control Detachment North, Forward Operating Base 2, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, distinguished himself on 13 June 1968, deep in enemy controlled territory, as an advisor to a long-range reconnaissance team of South Vietnamese irregular troops. The team was attacked and encircled by a battalion-sized North Vietnamese Army force. Specialist Fifth Class Kedenburg conducted a gallant rear guard fight against the pursuing enemy. His withering fire against the enemy permitted the team to reach a landing zone with the loss of only one man, who was unaccounted for. Specialist Fifth Class Kedenburg and three other members of the team harnessed themselves to the sling of the second hovering helicopter. The South Vietnamese soldier, previously unaccounted for, appeared in the landing zone. Specialist Fifth Class Kedenburg unhesitatingly gave up his place in the sling to the man and directed the pilot to leave the area. He continued then to engage the enemy who were swarming into the landing zone, killing six enemy soldiers before he was overpowered. Specialist Fifth Class Kedenburg's inspiring leadership, consummate courage and willing self-sacrifice permitted his small team to inflict heavy casualties on the enemy while escaping almost certain annihilation. His conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  21. (Back to Top) LIEUTENANT (JUNIOR GRADE) JOSEPH R KERREY, U.S. Navy, SEALs, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States in the name of the Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to LIEUTENANT (JUNIOR GRADE) JOSEPH R KERREY, UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE, for service as set forth in the following:
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a SEAL team leader during action against enemy aggressor (Viet Cong) forces, 14 March 1969. Acting in response to reliable intelligence, Lieutenant (jg) Kerrey led his SEAL team on a mission to capture important members of the enemy's area political cadre known to be located on an island in the bay of Nha Trang. In order to surprise the enemy, he and his team scaled a 350-foot sheer cliff to place themselves above the ledge on which the enemy was located. Splitting his team in two elements and coordinating both, Lieutenant (jg) Kerrey led his men in the treacherous downward descent to the enemy's camp. Just as they neared the end of their descent, intense enemy fire was directed at them, and Lieutenant (jg) Kerrey received massive injuries from a grenade which exploded at his feet and threw him backward onto the jagged rocks. Although bleeding profusely and suffering great pain, he displayed outstanding courage and presence of mind in immediately directing his element's fire into the heart of the enemy camp. Utilizing his radioman, Lieutenant (jg) Kerrey called in the second element's fire support which caught the confused Viet Cong in a devastating crossfire. After successfully suppressing the enemy's fire, and although immobilized by his multiple wounds, he continued to maintain calm, superlative control as he ordered his team to secure and defend an extraction site. Lieutenant (jg) Kerrey resolutely directed his men, despite his near-unconscious state, until he was eventually evacuated by helicopter. The havoc brought to the enemy by this very successful mission cannot be overestimated. The enemy soldiers who were captured provided critical intelligence to the allied effort. Lieutenant (jg) Kerrey's courageous and inspiring leadership, valiant fighting spirit, and tenacious devotion to duty in the face of almost overwhelming opposition sustain and enhance the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
  22. (Back to Top) SPECIALIST FOURTH CLASS ROBERT D. LAW, U.S. Army, Rangers, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to SPECIALIST FOURTH CLASS ROBERT D. LAW, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Specialist Fourth Class Robert D. Law, Company I (Ranger), distinguished himself while serving with the 75th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division, near Tinh Phuoc Thanh Province, Republic of Vietnam. On 22 February 1969, while on a long-range reconnaissance patrol, Specialist Fourth Class Law and five comrades made contact with a small enemy patrol. As the opposing elements exchanged intense fire, he maneuvered to a perilously exposed position flanking his comrades and began placing suppressive fire on the hostile troops. Although his team was hindered by a low supply of ammunition and suffered from an unidentified irritating gas in the air, Specialist Fourth Class Law's spirited defense and challenging counterassault rallied his fellow soldiers against the well-equipped hostile force. When an enemy grenade landed in his team's position, Specialist Fourth Class Law, instead of diving for safety in the stream behind him, threw himself on the grenade to save the lives of his comrades. Specialist Fourth Class Law displayed extraordinary courage and selfless concern for the lives of his men. His total disregard for his own personal safety and conspicuous gallantry at the cost of his life were above and beyond the call of duty and in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
  23. (Back to Top) SERGEANT JOHN L. LEVITOW, U.S. Air Force, 3rd Air Commando Squadron, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States in the name of the Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to SERGEANT JOHN L. LEVITOW, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Sergeant John L. Levitow (then Airman First Class), United States Air Force, distinguished himself by exceptional heroism on 24 February 1969, while assigned as a loadmaster aboard an AC-47 aircraft (3rd Air Commando Squadron) flying a night mission in support of Long Binh Army Post, Republic of Vietnam. On that date Sergeant Levitow's aircraft was struck by a hostile mortar round. The resulting explosion ripped a hole two feet in diameter through the wing and fragments made over 3,500 holes in the fuselage. All occupants of the cargo compartment were wounded and helplessly slammed against the floor and fuselage. The explosion tore an activated flare from the grasp of a crewmember who had been launching flares to provide illumination for Army ground troops engaged in combat. Sergeant Levitow, though stunned by the concussion of the blast and suffering from over forty fragment wounds in the back and legs, staggered to his feet and turned to assist the man nearest to him who had been knocked down and was bleeding heavily. As he was moving his wounded comrade forward and away from the opened cargo compartment door, he saw the smoking flare ahead of him in the aisle. Realizing the danger involved and completely disregarding his own wounds, Sergeant Levitow started toward the burning flare. The aircraft was partially out of control and the flare was rolling wildly from side to side. Sergeant Levitow struggled forward despite the loss of blood from his many wounds and the partial loss of feeling in his right leg. Unable to grasp the rolling flare with his hands, he threw himself bodily upon the burning flare. Hugging the deadly device to his body, he dragged himself to the rear of the aircraft and hurled the flare through the open cargo door. At that instant the flare separated and ignited in the air, but clear of the aircraft. Sergeant Levitow, by his selfless and heroic actions, saved the aircraft and its entire crew from certain death and destruction. Sergeant Levitow's conspicuous gallantry, his profound concern for his fellow man, and his intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Air Force and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.
  24. (Back to Top) STAFF SERGEANT FRANKLIN D. MILLER, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to STAFF SERGEANT FRANKLIN D. MILLER, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Staff Sergeant Franklin D. Miller, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, distinguished himself on 5 January 1970, as team leader of a joint American-Vietnamese long-range reconnaissance patrol operating deep within enemy territory in Kontum Province, Republic of Vietnam. Leaving the insertion point, the patrol moved forward on its mission when one of the team members tripped a hostile booby trap, wounding four soldiers. Staff Sergeant Miller, knowing that the explosion would alert the enemy, quickly administered first aid to the wounded and directed the team into positions across a small stream at the base of a steep hill. Within a few minutes, the lead element of an estimated platoon-sized enemy force was moving toward his location. Staff Sergeant Miller directed the small team to move up the hill to a more secure position. He remained alone, separated from the patrol to meet the attack. Staff Sergeant Miller single-handedly repulsed two determined attacks by the superior enemy force and caused them to withdraw in disorder. He rejoined his team, established contact with a forward air controller and arranged the evacuation of his patrol. The only suitable extraction location in the heavy jungle, however, was a bomb crater some 150 meters from the team. Staff Sergeant Miller reconnoitered the route to the crater and led his men through the enemy controlled jungle to the site. As the helicopter hovered to pick up the patrol, the enemy launched a savage automatic weapon and rocket propelled grenade attack against the beleaguered team. The attack drove off the rescue helicopter. Staff Sergeant Miller led the team in a valiant defense, driving the enemy back in its attempt to overrun the small patrol. Seriously wounded and every team member a casualty, Staff Sergeant Miller moved his men to a more protected location. He again moved forward to single-handedly meet the hostile attackers. From his forward exposed position, he gallantly repelled two attacks by the enemy before a friendly relief force arrived. Staff Sergeant Miller's conspicuous gallantry in action, his complete devotion to the welfare of his comrades, and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  25. (Back to Top) PETTY OFFICER 2ND CLASS MICHAEL A. MONSOOR, U.S. Navy, SEALs, Iraq
    Theater: CENTRAL
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as automatic weapons gunner for naval special warfare task group Arabian Peninsula, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on 29 September 2006. As a member of a combined SEAL and Iraqi army sniper over-watch element, tasked with providing early warning and stand-off protection from a rooftop in an insurgent held sector of Ar Ramadi, Iraq, Petty Officer Monsoor distinguished himself by his exceptional bravery in the face of grave danger. In the early morning, insurgents prepared to execute a coordinated attack by reconnoitering the area around the element's position. Element snipers thwarted the enemy's initial attempt by eliminating two insurgents. The enemy continued to assault the element, engaging them with a rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fire. As enemy activity increased, Petty Officer Monsoor took position with his machine gun between two teammates on an outcropping of the roof. While the SEALs vigilantly watched for enemy activity, an insurgent threw a hand grenade from an unseen location, which bounced off Petty Officer Monsoor's chest and landed in front of him. Although only he could have escaped the blast, Petty Officer Monsoor chose instead to protect his teammates. Instantly and without regard for his own safety, he threw himself onto the grenade to absorb the force of the explosion with his body, saving the lives of his two teammates. By his undaunted courage, fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of certain death, Petty Officer Monsoor gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
    For more information on Petty Officer Michael A. Monsoor, please visit the Congressional Medal of Honor Society's webpage on him, or visit the Navy Article.
  26. (Back to Top) LEUITENANT MICHAEL P. MURPHY, U.S. Navy, SEALs, Afghanistan
    (first MOH for this war zone, first for Navy since Vietnam)

    Theater: CENTRAL
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as the leader of a special reconnaissance element with Naval Special Warfare Task Unit Afghanistan on 27 and 28 June 2005. While leading a mission to locate a high-level anti-coalition militia leader, Lieutenant Murphy demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the face of grave danger in the vicinity of Asadabad, Konar Province, Afghanistan. On 28 June 2005, operating in an extremely rugged enemy-controlled area, Lieutenant Murphy's team was discovered by anti-coalition militia sympathizers who revealed their position to Taliban fighters. As a result, between 30 and 40 enemy fighters besieged his four-member team. Demonstrating exceptional resolve, Lieutenant Murphy valiantly led his men in engaging the large enemy force. The ensuing fierce firefight resulted in numerous enemy casualties, as well as the wounding of all four members of the team. Ignoring his own wounds and demonstrating exceptional composure, Lieutenant Murphy continued to lead and encourage his men. When the primary communicator fell mortally wounded, Lieutenant Murphy repeatedly attempted to call for assistance for his beleaguered teammates. Realizing the impossibility of communicating in the extreme terrain, and in the face of almost certain death, he fought his way into open terrain to gain a better position to transmit a call. This deliberate, heroic act deprived him of cover, exposing him to direct enemy fire. Finally achieving contact with his headquarters, Lieutenant Murphy maintained his exposed position while he provided his location and requested immediate support for his team. In his final act of bravery, he continued to engage the enemy until he was mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country and for the cause of freedom. By his selfless leadership, courageous actions, and extraordinary devotion to duty, Lieutenant Murphy reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
    For more information on Leuitenant Michael P. Murphy, please visit the Congressional Medal of Honor Society's webpage on him.
  27. (Back to Top) LIEUTENANT THOMAS R. NORRIS, U.S. Navy, SEALs, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States in the name of the Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to LIEUTENANT THOMAS R. NORRIS, UNITED STATES NAVY, for service as set forth in the following:
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty while completing an unprecedented ground rescue of two downed pilots deep within heavily controlled enemy territory in Quang Tri Province from 10 to 13 April 1972. Lieutenant Norris, on the night of 10 April, led a five-man patrol through 2,000 meters of heavily controlled enemy territory, located one of the downed pilots at daybreak, and returned to the Forward Operating Base (FOB). On 11 April, after a devastating mortar and rocket attack on the small FOB, Lieutenant Norris led a three-man team on two unsuccessful rescue attempts for the second pilot. On the afternoon of the 12th, a forward air controller located the pilot and notified Lieutenant Norris. Dressed in fishermen disguises and using a sampan, Lieutenant Norris and one Vietnamese traveled throughout that night and found the injured pilot at dawn. Covering the pilot with bamboo and vegetation, they began the return journey, successfully evading a North Vietnamese patrol. Approaching the FOB, they came under heavy machine gun fire. Lieutenant Norris called in an air strike which provided suppression fire and a smokescreen, allowing the rescue party to reach the FOB. By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, undaunted courage, and selfless dedication in the face of extreme danger, Lieutenant Norris enhanced the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
  28. (Back to Top) SERGEANT ROBERT J. PRUDEN, U.S. Army, Rangers, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to STAFF SERGEANT ROBERT J. PRUDEN, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Staff Sergeant Robert J. Pruden, Company G (Ranger), distinguished himself while serving with the 75th Infantry, Americal Division, near Quang Ngai Province, Republic of Vietnam, as a reconnaissance team leader. On 29 November 1969, Staff Sergeant Pruden was a reconnaissance team leader during an ambush mission. The six-man team, inserted by helicopter into enemy controlled territory, was to establish an ambush position and obtain information concerning enemy movements. As the team moved into the area, Staff Sergeant Pruden deployed his men into two groups on opposite sides of a well-used trail. As the groups were establishing their defensive positions, a Viet Cong squad opened fire, trapping one member of the team in the open. Realizing that their ambush position had been compromised, Staff Sergeant Pruden directed his team to open fire on the enemy force. Immediately, a second enemy element began returning fire. Staff Sergeant Pruden, with full knowledge of the extreme danger involved, left his concealed position, advanced toward the enemy, firing as he ran, thereby drawing the hostile fire away from his trapped comrades. Even though he was seriously wounded twice, he continued his attack until he fell for a third time in front of the enemy position. Staff Sergeant Pruden's actions resulted in several enemy casualties and withdrawal of the remaining enemy force. Although grievously wounded, he directed his men into defensive positions and called for evacuation helicopters, which safely withdrew the members of this team. Staff Sergeant Pruden displayed extraordinary heroism and selfless concern for the lives of his men. His total disregard for his own personal safety and conspicuous gallantry at the cost of his life was above and beyond the call of duty and in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
  29. (Back to Top) SERGEANT LASZLO RABEL, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 3,1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to STAFF SERGEANT LASZLO RABEL, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Staff Sergeant Laszlo Rabel distinguished himself while serving with Team Delta, 74th Infantry Detachment (Long Range Patrol), 173d Airborne Brigade, near Binh Dinh Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 13 November 1968. At 1000 hours, Team Delta was in a defensive perimeter conducting reconnaissance of enemy trail networks when a member of the team detected enemy movement to the front. As Staff Sergeant Rabel and a comrade prepared to clear the area, he heard an incoming grenade landing in the midst of the team's perimeter. With complete disregard for his life, he threw himself on the grenade, smothering it, receiving the complete impact of the explosion and averting the loss of life or injury to the other members of Team Delta. Through his indomitable courage, Staff Sergeant Rabel displayed extraordinary heroism and selfless concern for the lives of his fellow soldiers. His conspicuous gallantry at the cost of his life was above and beyond the call of duty in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
  30. (Back to Top) LIEUTENANT GEORGE K. SISLER, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 3, 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to FIRST LIEUTENANT GEORGE K. SISLER, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    First Lieutenant George K. Sisler, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam on 7 February 1967. First Lieutenant Sisler was the platoon leader/advisor to a special United States/Vietnam force. While on patrol deep within enemy territory, First Lieutenant Sisler's platoon was attacked from three sides by a company-sized enemy force. He quickly rallied his men, deploying them to a defensive position, and moved among his men to encourage and direct their efforts. Learning that two men had been wounded and were unable to pull back to the perimeter, First Lieutenant Sisler charged from the position through intense enemy fire to assist them. He began carrying one of them back to the perimeter when he was taken under intensive automatic weapon fire. Laying down his wounded comrade, he killed three onrushing soldiers by firing his rifle and then silenced the enemy machine gun with a grenade. As he returned the wounded men to the perimeter, the left flank came under heavy attack by superior enemy forces and several additional men of his platoon were wounded. Realizing the need to prevent his position from being overrun, First Lieutenant Sisler picked up some grenades and charged sin¬gle-handedly into the enemy onslaught, firing and throwing grenades. This heroic action broke up the vicious assault and forced the enemy to begin withdrawing. Despite enemy fire, First Lieutenant Sisler was moving about the battle directing air strikes when he fell mortally wounded. His extraordinary leadership, infinite courage and selfless concern for his men saved the lives of a number of his comrades. His actions reflect great credit upon himself and uphold the highest traditions of military service.
  31. (Back to Top) ENGINEMAN SECOND CLASS MICHAEL E. THORNTON, U.S. Navy, SEALs, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States in the name of the Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to ENGINEMAN SECOND CLASS, MICHAEL E. THORNTON, UNITED STATES NAVY, the following:
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against North Vietnamese communist aggressors in the Republic of Vietnam. On 31 October 1972, Petty Officer Thornton was assistant U.S. Navy advisor to the three-man Vietnamese Navy SEAL patrol conducting a covert intelligence gathering and prisoner capture operation against the North Vietnamese near the Cua Viet River in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam. While displacing to the beach, the patrol was engaged by enemy soldiers. During the fierce firefight which ensued, Petty Officer Thornton calmly gave reassurance to the other members of the patrol and returned devastating fire while the senior U.S. advisor, a Navy lieutenant, called in naval gunfire support. Having taken a heavy toll of the enemy, but greatly outnumbered and in danger of being surrounded, the patrol decided to execute a leapfrog extraction to the beach. As Petty Officer Thornton was withdrawing, he was informed that the senior U.S. Navy advisor, who had been providing covering fire, had been hit and was believed killed. Refusing to abandon his superior officer, Petty Officer Thornton ran forward 125 meters through heavy fire to the lieutenant's last position, killing two of the enemy about to overrun the position coincident with his arrival. Finding the lieutenant alive but unconscious from a serious head wound, he slung him on his back and fought his way to the sea some 400 meters away. Fully clothed in field gear, Petty Officer Thornton then swam with his unconscious and similarly clad burden through heavy surf and led the patrol safely seaward, despite the continuous fire of the frustrated enemy. He continued swimming seaward for approximately two hours, rendering first aid to his fellow advisor, until picked up by support craft. Through his extraordinary courage and endurance, Petty Officer Thornton was directly responsible for saving his superior officer's life and enabling the safe extraction of all members of the patrol, and was instrumental in the inflicting of heavy losses on a well-armed and numerically superior enemy force. His heroic actions and devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
    *The officer rescued was Lieutenant Tom Norris, a previous Medal of Honor recipient.
  32. (Back to Top) SERGEANT GORDON D. YNTEMA, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 3, 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to SERGEANT GORDON D. YNTEMA, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Sergeant Gordon D. Yntema, United States Army, distinguished himself on 16-18 January 1968, while assigned to Detachment A-431, Company D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, in the Republic of Vietnam. As part of a larger force of civilian irregulars from Camp Cai Cai, Sergeant Yntema accompanied two platoons to a blocking position east of the Village of Thong Binh. They became heavily engaged in a small arms fire fight with the Viet Cong. Assuming control of the force when the Vietnamese commander was seriously wounded, Sergeant Yntema advanced his troops to within 50 meters of the enemy bunkers. After a fierce 30-minute fire fight, Sergeant Yntema withdrew his men to a trench which offered them protection while still allowing them to perform their blocking mission. Under the cover of machine gun fire, approximately one company of Viet Cong maneuvered into a position effectively surrounding Yntema's platoons on three sides. A dwindling ammunition supply, coupled with a Viet Gong mortar barrage which inflicted heavy losses on the exposed position, prompted many of the South Vietnamese troops to withdraw. Seriously wounded and ordered to withdraw himself, Sergeant Yntema refused to leave his fallen comrades. Under withering small arms and machine gun fire, he carried the wounded Vietnamese commander and a mortally wounded American Special Forces advisor to a small gully 50 meters away to shield them from the enemy fire. Sergeant Yntema continued to repulse the attacking Viet Cong during their attempts to overrun his position until, out of ammunition and surrounded, he was offered the opportunity to surrender. Refusing, Sergeant Yntema stood his ground, using his rifle as a club to fight the approximately fifteen Viet Cong attempting his capture. His resistance was so fierce that the Viet Cong were forced to shoot him in order to overcome him. Sergeant Yntema's personal bravery in the face of insurmountable odds and supreme self-sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  33. (Back to Top) FIRST LIEUTENANT CHARLES Q. WILLIAMS, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 3, 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL HONOR to FIRST LIEUTENANT CHARLES Q. WILLIAMS, UNITED STATES ARMY for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    First Lieutenant Charles Q. Williams, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, distinguished himself on 9-10 June 1965, while serving as the Executive Officer of the Special Forces Camp at Dong Xoai, Republic of Vietnam. On 9 June, the camp was attacked by a Viet Cong reinforced regiment which threatened to overrun the camp and the adjacent District Headquarters. First Lieutenant Williams awoke and organized personnel, determined where the source of the enemy's main thrust was, and then led his men to their defensive positions on the south and west walls. Running to the District Headquarters to establish communications with his commanding officer in another compound, First Lieutenant Williams discovered that the radio was not operational. Attempting to reach the other compound, he was halted by intense enemy fire and he sustained a shrapnel wound in his leg. Ignoring his wound, he returned to District Headquarters where he directed the defense against the first assault. As the insurgents scaled the walls and some of the Vietnamese defenders began to retreat, he dashed from his position through a barrage of gunfire, successfully rallying the defenders and leading them back to their positions. Wounded in the thigh and left leg during this action, First Lieutenant Williams returned to his position where he was told that communications had been reestablished, but that his commanding officer was seriously wounded. Taking charge of both compounds, he attempted to reach the communications bunker, but again was wounded, this time in the stomach and right arm. As casualties mounted and the defenders tired, First Lieutenant Williams consolidated the American personnel from both compounds and established a defense at the District building. Making radio contact with a friendly air controller, he used descending flares as reference points to adjust air strikes. The men, inspired by his courage, held off the advancing Viet Cong by throwing grenades out the windows. The Viet Cong continued to besiege the stronghold throughout the night. When daylight came, First Lieutenant Williams and another volunteer worked their way to the berm south of the Headquarters. Taking aim with a 3.5" rocket launcher, First Lieutenant Williams disabled an enemy machine gun emplacement 150 meters away. While returning to the District building, First Lieutenant Williams and his comrade were both wounded. First Lieutenant Williams pulled his wounded comrade to a covered position. Back at the District building, although seriously wounded and tired, he ensured the evacuation of the wounded man, then continued to direct air strikes. By afternoon, the Viet Cong began firing directly into the building with recoilless rifle fire. First Lieutenant Williams ordered all seriously wounded personnel moved to the safety of the communications bunker. When informed that helicopters would land, he led his team to the landing zone, ensuring a timely evacuation of the wounded from both locations. Throughout the 14-hour battle, First Lieutenant Williams' leadership, devotion to his men, and conspicuous courage at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty, reflects the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.
  34. (Back to Top) SERGEANT FIRST CLASS FRED W. ZABITOSKY, U.S. Army, Special Forces, Vietnam
    Theater: PACIFIC
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 3, 1863, has awarded in the name of the Congress the MEDAL OF HONOR to SERGEANT FIRST CLASS FRED W. ZABITOSKY, UNITED STATES ARMY, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Sergeant First Class (then Staff Sergeant) Fred W. Zabitosky distinguished himself while serving as an assistant team leader of a nine-man Special Forces long-range reconnaissance patrol operating deep within enemy held territory in Laos. On 19 February 1968, they were attacked by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army unit. Rallying his team members, Sergeant First Class Zabitosky deployed them into defensive positions and exposed himself to concentrated enemy fire in order to better direct their return fire. He next began covering their withdrawal to a landing zone for helicopter extraction. Rejoining the patrol, now under increased enemy pressure, he positioned each man in a tight perimeter defense, encouraging them one by one and controlling their fire. Inspired by his example, the patrol maintained its position until the arrival of the rescue helicopter. As the helicopters arrived, the North Vietnamese pressed their attack. Sergeant First Class Zabitosky again repeatedly exposed himself to their fire, allowing the helicopter gunship to adjust suppressive fire around the landing zone. Boarding one of the helicopters, he positioned himself as a door gunner, firing on the enemy as the ship took off. The helicopter crashed after being engulfed in a hail of bullets and Sergeant First Class Zabitosky was thrown from the craft. Recovering consciousness, he ignored his painful injuries and moved to the flaming wreckage. Heedless of the danger of exploding ordnance and fuel and showing resolute valor, he pulled the severely wounded pilot from the blaze and made repeated attempts to rescue his fellow patrol members but was driven back by the intense heat. Despite his own serious burns and crushed ribs, he carried the unconscious pilot through a curtain of enemy fire to within ten feet of a hovering rescue helicopter before collapsing. Sergeant First Class Zabitosky's valiant efforts and conspicuous gallantry were above and beyond the call of duty and in the highest traditions of the military service, reflecting the utmost credit upon himself, the Special Forces and the United States Army.

For complete listing of all the current Medal of Honor Recipients, please go to the Congressional Medal of Honor Society website.


Check back for updates to this page.